• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Political Cartoon Assignment History Of Slavery

1. To begin this lesson, it is important to discuss each of the vocabulary for analysis. These vocabulary words are set up to help your students determine the author’s point of view. You can use the examples given or come up with your own as you see fit. If your students have never seen some of the vocabulary words, this will probably take a little longer, yet for students who are already familiar with the terms this will work as a refresher.

2. Next, go over with the students the vocabulary for historical context. These are people or terms that will show up in the political cartoons; therefore, they should at least know the bare minimum. This way, when they see the words or names, they have enough background knowledge to understand the picture. It will be best for each student to be given a handout with the historical content necessary so that he or she can refer to it while observing the cartoons.

3. Now, explore the Common Symbolism worksheet with students. This will help them grasp common themes that will pop up in political cartoons, such as donkeys representing the Democratic Party, elephants representing the Republican Party, and rats representing dirt or filth, etc.

4. Once the students have sufficient background knowledge, you can display the political cartoons. Have the students take out their Political Cartoons Analysis worksheet and fill out a row for each cartoon. Make sure to walk students through the first cartoon, pointing out how each of the vocabulary is used in the cartoon.

5. By cartoon two or three, begin to let students write out on their own the symbolism, irony, point of view, exaggeration, and analogy that they find in the cartoons. By the end, they should be able to work independently to figure out what the cartoon is depicting, using their vocabulary and common symbolism worksheets as a guide. After students finish their independent assessment of a couple cartoons, present the findings with the class to make sure students understood.

6. As a final objective, ask students, individually or in pairs, to create a cartoon of their own which expresses their point of view on a specific topic. This final objective can be historical, relating to the topics in the cartoons, or something from their everyday life. For example, ask them how they would use symbolism to show things in their everyday life, such as “Cleaning their room,”  “Lunchtime at school,” or “Snow Day,” just to give a couple of topic examples.  Also, you could ask them to create a cartoon that talks about a specific topic in history that was being discussed such as the Civil War or a Presidential election etc.

Results: 1-25 of 46   |   Refined by: Part of: Cartoon Prints, American   RemoveSubject: Slavery   RemoveSubject: Political Cartoons   Remove

Collection Items

  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Why dont you take it? 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 25 x 40 cm. (image) | In February 1861 Washington was alarmed by rumors that secessionists planned to seize the city and make it the capital of the Confederacy. The print may have been produced in that context, or during Lincoln's call to arms and rather anxious military build-up of the capital in April. Here, General...
    • Contributor: Beard, Frank T. - Vent, Starr & Co.
    • Date:1861
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    United States slave trade, 1830 An abolitionist print possibly engraved in 1830, but undocumented aside from the letterpress text which appears on an accompanying sheet. The text reads: "United States' slave trade, 1830. The Copper Plate from which the above picture has just been engraved, was found many years ago by workmen engaged in removing the ruins of Anti-Slavery Hall, in Philadelphia, which was burned by a mob in...
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Abolition frowned down 1 print : lithograph with watercolor on wove paper ; 24.8 x 38.1 cm. (image) | A satire on enforcement of the "gag-rule" in the House of Representatives, prohibiting discussion of the question of slavery. Growing antislavery sentiment in the North coincided with increased resentment by southern congressmen of such discussion as meddlesome and insulting to their constituencies. The print may relate to John...
    • Contributor: Dacre, Henry, Approximately 1820 - Robinson, Henry R.
    • Date:1839
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    American sympathy and Irish backguardism 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 33.2 x 47.7 cm. (image) | A critical look at Irish Repeal movement leader Daniel O'Connell's condemnation of slavery in the United States. Clay portrays O'Connell's agitation against slavery as an affront to American friends of repeal, who contributed sizable amounts of money for "rent" to support the insurgent movement in Ireland. Conversely, Clay also portrays...
    • Contributor: Clay, Edward Williams - Robinson, Henry R.
    • Date:1843
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    O'Connell's call and Pat's reply 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 31.1 x 46.5 cm. (image) | A condemnation of Daniel O'Connell's agitation of Irish immigrants in the United States against slavery. The artist, certainly E.W. Clay, presents a loaded contrast between turbulent conditions in Ireland and the idyllic, relative prosperity of the immigrant's lot in America. It is the period of the Irish campaign for repeal...
    • Contributor: Clay, Edward Williams - Robinson, Henry R.
    • Date:1843
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Matty meeting the Texas question 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 29.9 x 44.5 cm. (image) | A satire on the Democrats' approach to the delicate question of the annexation of Texas. In marked contrast to his portrayal of the issue as a beautiful woman in "Virtuous Harry" (no. 1844-27), the artist here presents Texas as the ugly hag War or Chaos, brandishing a dagger, pistols, whips,...
    • Contributor: Baillie, James S., Active - Bucholzer, H.
    • Date:1844
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The Massachusetts hoar, outwitted, or hopping-John, and Johnny-cake, for cod fish 'notions,' wide awake!!! 1 print : lithograph with watercolor on wove paper ; 27 x 37 cm. (image) | An imaginative but puzzling commentary on sectional tensions over slavery between New England abolitionists and southern agrarian slaveholders. In his sweeping satire the artist also portrays a considerable hostility toward blacks as existing among various ethnic groups, including the Germans, French, Irish, and Scots. The title and main...
    • Contributor: Akin, James, Approximately
    • Date:1845
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The Democratic funeral of 1848 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 24.4 x 37.6 cm. (image) | Foreseeing political death for the Democrats in the election, the artist imagines a funeral of the party's standard-bearers with a procession of the faithful. Democratic senators (left to right) Sam Houston of Texas, Thomas Hart Benton of Missouri, (obscured unidentified man), and South Carolina's John Calhoun carry a litter bearing...
    • Contributor: Durang, Edwin Forrest - Abel & Durang
    • Date:1848
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Whig harmony 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 29.4 x 39.1 cm. (image) | A severe split within the Whig ranks, between partisans of Henry Clay and those of Zachary Taylor, preceded the party's convention in June 1848. Here Horace Greeley, one of Clay's most influential northern supporters, tries to drive the party wagon downhill toward "Salt River" (a contemporary idiom for political doom)....
    • Contributor: Baillie, James S., Active - Bucholzer, H.
    • Date:1848
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Town & country making another drive at the great question.--No go!! 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 24.9 x 36.3 cm. (image) | A mild reproof of Zachary Taylor's evasion of the slavery question in the campaign of 1848. Although Taylor's views were widely broadcast in the form of published letters, his stand on the main issue--the Wilmot Proviso--remained unexpressed. (The Wilmot Proviso would have banned slavery in U.S. territories acquired during the...
    • Contributor: Clay, Edward Williams - Robinson, Henry R.
    • Date:1848
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The hurly-burly pot 1 print : lithograph with watercolor, on wove paper ; 27 x 39.2 cm. (image) | The artist attacks abolitionist, Free Soil, and other sectionalist interests of 1850 as dangers to the Union. He singles out for indictment radical abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, Pennsylvania Free Soil advocate David Wilmot, New York journalist Horace Greeley, and Southern states' rights spokesman Senator John C. Calhoun. The...
    • Contributor: Baillie, James S., Active
    • Date:1850
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Scene in Uncle Sam's Senate. 17th April 1850 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 28.6 x 44.2 cm. (image) | A somewhat tongue-in-cheek dramatization of the moment during the heated debate in the Senate over the admission of California as a free state when Mississippi senator Henry S. Foote drew a pistol on Thomas Hart Benton of Missouri. In the cartoon Benton (center) throws open his coat and defiantly states,...
    • Contributor: Clay, Edward Williams
    • Date:1850
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Slavery as it exists in America. Slavery as it exists in England 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 44.8 x 27 cm. (image) | A challenge to the Northern abolitionist view of the institution of slavery, favorably contrasting the living conditions of American slaves (above) with the lot of the industrial poor in England (below). The first scene is impossibly naive: Southern slaves dance and play as four gentlemen--two Northerners and two Southerners--observe. First...
    • Contributor: Haven, John
    • Date:1850
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Effects of the Fugitive-Slave-Law 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 33.3 x 44.3 cm. (image) | An impassioned condemnation of the Fugitive Slave Act passed by Congress in September 1850, which increased federal and free-state responsibility for the recovery of fugitive slaves. The law provided for the appointment of federal commissioners empowered to issue warrants for the arrest of alleged fugitive slaves and to enlist the...
    • Contributor: Kaufmann, Theodor - Hoff & Bloede
    • Date:1850
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    The apotheosis 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 27.8 x 19.1 cm. (image) | The print is a fragment of a larger lithograph entitled "Invasion of Cuba," composed of two panels, applauding American "filibustering" expeditions to liberate Cuba from Spain. (See also "The Great Naval Blockade of Round Island" and "Genl Lopez the Cuban Patriot Getting His Cash," nos. 1849-5 and 1850-10.) "Invasion of...
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 27.7 x 43.9 cm. (image) | The opposition of Northern abolitionists, churchmen, and political figures to enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 is criticized in this rare pro-Southern cartoon. In two panels artist Edward Williams Clay illustrates the abolitionist's invocation of a "higher law" against the claim of a slave owner, and the application...
    • Contributor: Clay, Edward Williams
    • Date:1851
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Practical illustration of the Fugitive Slave Law 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 28.3 x 36.3 cm (image) | A satire on the antagonism between Northern abolitionists on the one hand, and Secretary of State Daniel Webster and other supporters of enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Here abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison (left) holds a slave woman in one arm and points a pistol toward a burly...
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Eclipse & no eclipse or two views of one object 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 27 x 38 cm. (image) | Two scenes showing the differing perceptions of Franklin Pierce's stand on the issue of slavery, as viewed by the North and South. The cartoon is divided vertically by "Mason & Dixon's Line." An arrow identifies the left panel as the North and the right as the South. On the left,...
    • Contributor: Childs, J. (John)
    • Date:1852
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Position of the Democratic Party in 1852. "Freemen of America, how long will you be ledd by such leaders" 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 31.3 x 42.4 cm. (image) | A crudely drawn satire bitterly attacking Democratic presidential candidate Franklin Pierce and appealing to the "Freemen of America." The print, possibly executed by a free black, criticizes the Democrats' platform, as established by the Baltimore Convention, which in the interest of preserving the Union endorsed the Compromise of 1850. More...
    • Contributor: Leach, William K. - Marsh, Bela
    • Date:1852
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    A dish of "black turtle" 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 28.1 x 41.8 cm. (image) | The cartoonist mocks the opportunism evident in Winfield Scott's endorsement of both the abolitionist cause and the Missouri Compromise. Scott, in military uniform, is seated at a table with a plate of soup before him. He lifts his spoon from the plate and finds in it a kneeling black man,...
    • Contributor: Currier, Nathaniel - Magee, John L.
    • Date:1852
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Democratic platform illustrated 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 31.3 x 34.2 cm. (image) | Another attack on the 1856 Democratic platform as pro-South and proslavery. The Buchanan-Breckenridge ticket is reviled on the basis of recent developments occurring during the outgoing Pierce administration. In the center of the picture is a flagstaff bearing an American flag inscribed "Buchanan & Breckenridge. Modern Democracy." To its base...
    • Contributor: Thurston - Varney, James G.
    • Date:1856
  • Photo, Print, Drawing
    Congressional surgery. Legislative quackery 1 print : lithograph on wove paper ; 25 x 21 cm. (sheet, trimmed to image) | A rare anti-North satire, probably dealing with either the Crittenden Compromise or the Douglas Compromise. Proposed in December 1860 in the form of several constitutional amendments, the former called for restoration of the Missouri Compromise line and prohibition of slavery north of it. Stephen Douglas's compromise, an...

Refine your results

Contributor

  • Clay, Edward Williams5
  • Magee, John L.4
  • Robinson, Henry R.4
  • N. Currier (Firm)3
  • Baillie, James S., Active3
  • Currier & Ives3
  • Maurer, Louis2
  • Bucholzer, H.2
  • Akin, James, Approximately1
  • Abel & Durang1

One thought on “Political Cartoon Assignment History Of Slavery

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *