• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Movie Review Assignment Sheet

 

 What sticks out about the film?

 A good thing?

 A bad thing?

Explain using specific details or examples.

2.

 Summarize

 your thoughts and make a

recommendation

 for viewing or not viewing the film somewhere in your review (most often the end of your review).

A Walk to Freedom the Selma Story

Placing one foot in front of the other Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his following led the American Colored Population towards success in a Civil Rights Movement in a time when death was almost certain. My enjoyment of this film by far surpasses that of other films which depict a similar time frame in our world's history. The time is 1964, and although United States of America has legally desegregated the South, the act of segregation and the racism is at an all time high, and is running rampant in the Southern States. This film takes an in-depth look into the historical value of the city of Selma, Alabama and how it became the forefront in a battle against violence and oppression as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (David Oyelowo), sets forth on a peace march with his followers towards Montgomery, Alabama. They are met with hardships, and defeat in which stirs the entire country into recognizing the acts of terrorism upon its own people and how a change needed to be embraced. Shining a light upon a dark period of history is actively done through the strong representation of characters

cast

 within this movie. The director strongly looked into the past histories, and found fitting characters to match these former individuals in our history, with the likes of David Oyelowo (Martin Luther King), Carmen Ejogo (Coretta Scott King) who both have similar facial features to the real people, and in so turn

acted

 with similar mannerisms as well. While these characters were cast to look similar to their characters, there were other actors placed within this movie strictly because of the pull that they have in regards to how famous they are such as: Oprah Winfrey, Cuba Gooding Jr. Niecy Nash and Common. It is a combination of both the casting and how the individuals acted in which makes this cast so strong. Yet, it is not the only thing, the brilliant

writers

 created a script of

dialogue

 that places the audience right there in Selma, Alabama with appropriate dialects, and common speech patterns, coupled with the specific

makeup and costumes

 which all created and depicted a time frame that is clearly not present day which in turn makes the movie

believable

 because we the audience can see and understand the historical faction of this movie. While these are not the only things that make this movie great they are by far what helps it towards its success. With glowing recommendation I make the suggestion that you take the time to watch this film, for the sheer reason that the movies effectiveness is outstanding. Every choice that the director made, every angle, casting choice, costume and everything else that goes into a production was effective towards the audience understanding the value of history. It depicts such a negative time period in a way that allows the audience to feel like they are part of the brutality, the violence and in the end the walk towards hope.

Checklist for a Movie Review: Overall:

Title

Paragraph 1:





Short Writing Assignments

Journal Entries, Ruminations, Quickwrites, Single Paragraphs

    Topics for short writing assignments can include the contribution to the film's story made by one of the following: (1) a cinematic element, such as music; (2) a theatrical element, such as lighting; or (3) a literary element of the film's story, such as expository phase, theme, plot, conflict, symbol, or characterization. Topics for short writing assignments can also include:
    1. What was the strongest emotion that you felt when watching the film?

    2. What did you learn from this movie?

    3. Which character did you [admire, hate, love, pity] the most?

    Journal Entries:    Students can be assigned to write a journal entry, either in class or as homework, responding to the events or episodes in the movie as it progresses. The journal may or may not be focused on one topic; topics can change each day.
    Sample Assignment: We are going to be watching the movie, "Remember the Titans," for part of the class period each day this week. As homework, every day after a class in which we watch the film, I'd like you to write a short journal entry about your reactions to the movie so far. [Describe the length of the entry desired or the amount of time students should spend writing the entry.]
    Ruminations: Students can be required to write ruminations in which they respond to the motivations, values, or attributes of characters in the film.
    Sample assignment: We are going to be watching the movie "Cyrano de Bergerac." After you have seen the movie, please write a page or two of your thoughts about whether Cyranno was a bully. Include a comparison of his actions in the play to those of a bully you know or have heard about.
    Single Paragraphs: Students can be asked to write a single paragraph about an element of a film and how that element contributes to the story or to the artistic presentation.
    Sample Assignment: Write a paragraph about the use of camera angle in the scene in which Dorothy first meets the Wizard of Oz. The topic of your paragraph is: "What does the camera angle add to the scene?" The paragraph should have a topic sentence, citations to evidence to support the point being made, and a conclusion.
    Quickwrites: Students can be asked to write without preparation and in a set period of time, their thoughts or observations on a topic selected by the teacher. Quickwrites often become a ritual at the beginning of each class.
    Sample Assignment: "To Kill a Mockingbird" ends with two ironic twists. Name one of them, describe why it is ironic and what theme of the story is highlighted by the ironic events.


    Essays - Formal and Persuasive


    Topics for Formal or Persuasive Essays with Research Outside the Confines of the Story
    Historical Accuracy: Students can research and evaluate the historical accuracy of the film or of a scene in the film and, where inaccuracies are found, students can theorize about the filmmakers' reasons for making the change from the facts.

    Historical, Cultural, or Literary Allusions: In many films, historical, cultural, or literary allusions are important in conveying ideas. Students can be assigned to investigate one or more of these references.

    Differences Between the Book and the Movie: When a movie is based on a book, students can be asked to describe those differences, ascertain whether the movie is true to the story told by the book, and make a judgment about whether the changes made by the movie improved the story.

    Themes and Messages: Students can be asked to identify and evaluate, using research from sources other than the film, the wisdom of any theme or message which the filmmakters are trying to convey.

    Issues of Interest Relating to the Subject Matter of the Story: All films present issues of interest to the audience aside from the story itself. For example, the concept of attachment disorder is important in the film "Good Will Hunting" even though the film can be appreciated without knowing much about the disorder. However, the film may motivate students to research and write an essay about attachment disorder. The movie "October Sky" refers to the early U.S. and Russian space programs. Students who have seen this movie can be assigned to write an essay about what has occurred in space exploration in the last twenty years and how it differs from what occurred in the 1950s and 1960s.

    Topics for Essays Based on an Analysis of the Film
    Literary Elements and Devices in the Story Presented by the Film: These include plot, subplot, theme, irony, foreshadowing, flash-forward, flashback, characterization, and symbol. Students should be required to describe the use of one element or device and its contribution to the overall message of the film. TWM offers a Film Study Worksheet to assist students in organizing their thoughts for this assignment.

    Cinematic Elements in the Film: Cinematic elements include: shot (framing, angle, and camera movement), sound (including music), lighting, and editing. Students can be asked to identify and discuss the cinematic elements in an entire film or to focus their analysis on a particular scene. The analysis can be limited to the use of one cinematic element or it can include several. Students should be required to describe the use of the cinematic element as well as its contribution to the overall message and artistic presentation of the movie or the scene. See the TWM student handout: Introducing Cinematic and Theatrical Elements in Film. TWM also offers a worksheet to help students identify theatrical elements in a film. See TWM's worksheet entitled Cinematic and Theatrical Elements and Their Effects.

    Theatrical Elements in the Film: Theatrical elements found in movies include: costumes, props, set design, and acting choice. Students can be asked to identify and discuss the theatrical elements in an entire film or to focus their analysis on a particular scene. The analysis can be limited to the use of one theatrical element or it can include several. Students should be required to describe the use of the theatrical element as well as its contribution to the overall message and artistic presentation of the movie or the scene. See the TWM student handout: Introducing Cinematic and Theatrical Elements in Film. TWM also offers a worksheet to help students ""identify theatrical elements in a film. See TWM's worksheet entitled Cinematic and Theatrical Elements and Their Effects.



Creative Writing Assingments and Film Critiques


    Creative Writing Assignments: Tasks which will stimulate students' creativity include: (1) write a new ending to the story; (2) add new characters or new events to an existing scene and show how the story changes as a result; (3) write an additional scene or incident, with its own setting, action, and dialogue; (4) expand the back-story of one of the characters and make it into a separate story; (5) write a letter from a character in the story to the student, or from a character in the story to the class, or from one character in the story to another character in the story, or from the student to a character in the story; (6) outline, story board, or write a sequel.
    Sample Assignment: Imagine that Jean Valjean is still mayor of his adopted town of Montreuil-sur-mer. You are Bishiop Myriel, the man who had faith in Jean even though Jean stole his candle sticks and other silver. Jean has requested that you write a letter to Javert asking Javert to leave Jean Valjean alone. What would you say in that letter? Think about the nature of the man the Bishop is trying to convince, the tone he would take, and the arguments he would present. [Describe the length of the letter.]
    Film Critiques: Some students will enjoy writing a review of the movie, possibly for publication in the student newspaper. Students should be instructed to make sure that they cite evidence to support their views.
    Sample Assignment: Imagine that you are a film critic for a major newspaper. Write a critique of the film, "The Outsiders." Be sure to support your conclusions with evidence and logical arguments. [Describe the length of the critique.]

Other Assignments, Projects and Activities

    Mock Interviews:    Students can work together in groups of two to write and perform a mock interview in which one plays a character in the film and the other takes on the role of the interviewer. The answers should reveal the values of the character.

    Debates:    Many films offer controversial social or political ideas which can easily become the topic of vigorous debate. Students can be divided into teams to support or oppose an idea presented by the film.

    The Great Divide    Separate the class into two groups representing sides taken on a particular issue. Students in support of the point should sit together facing those opposed to the point. Students should use the rules of Accountable Talk to argue their positions. Accountable Talk requires that students listen carefully and adhere to a code for responses to one another's words. Each respondent must begin his or her point with phrases such as:

    I hear what you are saying, but . . .
    Your point is good; however I want to say . . .
    I'm unclear about what you mean . . .
    Granted, your point has validity; however, consider . . .
    I understand what you are saying; however, the facts are . . .

    Students may not resort to name calling or any other insults and must back up their points with reference to the work being discussed. When students hear points that cause them to change their minds, they must get up and take a seat on the other side. Often, an entire class will become convinced of one position and all seats will be moved to one side of the room. Pro-con T-Chart organizers or any other form of note taking can be beneficial so that students can refer to points they felt were important when it comes time to write their essays.

    Socratic Chairs:    Place a number of chairs at the front of the room and select appropriate students to fill them. These students will serve as a panel to discuss the issue that must be resolved or at least clarified so that the students can write their essays. Students remaining in their desks should take notes using a graphic organizer, such as a pro-con T-Chart, and can ask questions either during or at the end of the panel's discussion. Sometimes students may want to relinquish a chair to a member of the audience in order to further the point he or she is making. Vary the rules to fit the goals of the discussion but keep to the rules of Accountable Talk.

    Creative Projects:    Students can be given the opportunity to compose poetry, music, song, or dance relating to an idea in a film. They can also produce a film or create a painting or a poster.




One thought on “Movie Review Assignment Sheet

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *